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It seems like as soon as a man or woman hits their 50s, the world is no longer interested! They are no longer deemed fashion-suitable, and clothes are no longer made for them. Campaigns don't reflect their image and the mature segment of the society are simply dismissed as pass-overs.With this write-up, we want to make it abundantly clear that gone are the days when hitting the 50s was the end of life as you knew it.


This is the new world order, where age has zero relevance, and looking good at any age is the new mantra.

After all, “It was NEVER about age, it was ALWAYS about style.”

Perhaps one of the biggest myths about women over 60s is that they are the least interested in fashion. Why would that be the case? Especially when considering that these women are so much more confident than their younger years; with a strong sense of self and a better understanding of their personalities!
Now, they actually know how to dress as ’themselves’ and not be a cheap copy of others.

To prove our point, we talked to Sabina Alam, a fashionable Bangladeshi lady, who’s comfortably in her 60s and considers fashion a daily part of her life.

Sabina Alam –

“I love wearing a deshi cotton sari almost every day of my life; be it for the office or a soiree with close friends,” says Alam, who is a director of a private organisation and also works with numerous social institutions.

“I don’t believe in spending too much time to be stylish, it has got to be an effortless process – for me, style relates to being comfortable, organised and wearing what I like!”

Today, as we interview her, Alam sports jet-black hair swaying way below the midriff, an aesthetic sleeveless blouse revealing her toned arms, a white Jamdani with hot pink floral motifs, and an endearing personality.
I have always loved my Jamdanis – there is nothing to second that. Plus, I love wearing deshi clothes, I feel that it’s our inherent duty to promote our own products,” says the lady with two incongruent qualities – a fleeting imperiousness and an engaging humility – blended together finely with the advancing years.

As we chat, we discover that her two daughters, who live abroad, also prefer to wear saris most of the time. “And why not?” says Alam.

“It is, after all, the only outfit that makes every Bangladeshi woman look her best. I have been inspired by my mother, and my daughters have been inspired by me!”

She pauses to dab her eyes. As she lifts her tea she clarifies “Don’t get me wrong! I also love wearing pants, kameezs and long skirts – especially when I am abroad and have to walk for miles. And styling with these outfits would be a proper shoe, hair tied up in a knot and a fresh face. With the sari however, I’d probably dress up a bit more, with a proper teep, and flower tucked in a bun. But I’d never over-do my look.”
Alam agrees with us that women look their best when not trying to dress young. “I am very comfortable with my age and I wouldn’t let anything in the world take that away from me. My first priority is, however, to stay healthy and fit.” Alam is also super particular about being appropriately dressed at the office.

“If you are working somewhere, you need to look respectable, so that other people are inspired by you. I am very particular about wearing ironed clothes and wearing appropriate accessories that match” declares Alam.

Trying to explain fashion to the younger generation, she says, “It’s not about being chic and trendy, but about being in love with who you are. Wear clothes that define you and everything else will fall into place.”

Definitely an engaging conversation with a sophisticated lady with undeniable wit, providing us a fresh outlook towards the mature segment of the society.

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